Heraldry Online Blog

24 February 2011

Harpur Crewe – Livery button

An interesting livery button is listed on eBay.  Not only has it impaled Arms but three crests.

This appears to be the livery button of Vauncey Harpur-Crewe who married in 1846 the Hon Isabel Adderley daughter of Charles Bowyer Adderley, 1st Baron Norton.  Upon the death of his father in 1886 Vauncey Harpur-Crewe became the 10th Harpur-Crewe Baronet of Calke Abbey.

Arms:

Quarterly 1st & 4th Azure a lion rampant (for Crewe) 2nd & 3rd Argent a lion rampant within a bordure engrailed Sable (Harpur)
impaling
Argent on a bend Azure three mascles of the field (for Adderley)

Crest:

Left: Out of a ducal coronet Or a lion’s gamb Argent armed gules (Crewe)

Centre: Not identified

Right: A boar passant Or ducally gorged and crined Gules (Harpur)

I have had no joy so far in identifying the middle crest.  Since it has a cross I am wondering if it is some reference to Calke Abbey.

Image courtesy of the vendor, jibajaba.

Updated:

My thanks again to Arthur Radburn over at the HSS. He found reference to:

The first of the family to be knighted apparently was Sir Robert le Harpur (seventh generation), son of Gilbert le Harpur and his wife Isolda (Morton) le Harpur. Sir Robert lived in the time of Edward II (1284-1327) and bore for his arms a plain cross, and the same for his crest, issuing out of a coronet.

So perhaps the middle crest is a reference to the ancient Harpur crest?

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