Heraldry Online Blog

21 July 2020

Bookplate: Alexander Mitchell-Innes of Ayton & Whitehall

eBay vendor, ampersand-design, is offering for sale a bookplate of Alexander Michell-Innes of Ayton & Whitehall.

Mitchell Innes Bookplate2

Arms: Quarterly 1st & 4th Argent three mullets of six points Gules within a bordure Gules charged with eight besants (for Innes) 2nd & 3rd Sable on a fess between three mascles Or three mullets Gules (for Mitchell).

Crests: The dexter side: An increscent proper (for Innes), the sinister side A hand holding a garland of all proper (for Mitchell)

Mottoes: Je recois pour donner (for Innes), Deo favente (for Mitchell)

Alexander Mitchell-Innes of Ayton and Whitehall (b.1811 d.1886) was the son of William Mitchell of Parsonsgreen (b.1778 d.1860).  In 1839 William was the main beneficiary of the personal estate of his cousin Miss Jane Innes.  He bought the estates of Ayton and Whitehall.  In 1840 he changed his name to Mitchell-Innes by Royal Licence and matriculated Arms (30th March 1840, Volume 4 Record 45).

Booklate-Mitchel-Innes

Mitchell-Innes Armorial Families

Armorial Families 1929

Armorial: The Recorded Arms for Mitchell

29 January 2011

Heraldic Bookplates

Filed under: Heraldry — Stephen J F Plowman @ 17:07
Tags: , ,

A new departure for me is the heraldic bookplate.  Whilst  I did devise my own bookplate and duly plastered it liberally around my assorted hardbacks, I had not given that aspect of heraldry any real thought.  However, my recent excursions into eBay has rather opened my eyes to that means of heraldic & genealogical display.  Whilst I have no plans to collect bookplates myself, I do enjoy the challenge of putting names, blazons and, possibly, some family history to them.  Particularly so, if the surname is one of those I’ve covered in my “One Name Armorials”.

The heraldic bookplate provides a snapshot of the owner – at least as the owner wished to be viewed.  What will always be hard to ascertain is whether or not the Arms or family connections displayed are accurate.  The heraldic engravers of the past were quite often the “bucket shops” of their day.

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