Heraldry Online Blog

11 September 2009

The Daubuz Gainsborough

Filed under: People — Stephen J F Plowman @ 07:30
Tags: , , , ,

An update regarding the earlier topic “Wax Seals”;

I made posts about the seals at rec.heraldry, the Heraldry society of Scotland and the International Association of Amateur Heralds. My colleague, John Tunesi of Liongam, identified the Arms as those of DAUBUZ.

Arms: Ermine a chevron gules between three acorns slipped and pendent proper [in chief a crescent for difference]
Crest: A griffin’s head with wings addorsed [no tinctures given for the crest]

Source: Burke’s General Armory – p. 264 & Papworth’s Ordinary – p. 428

An email from Mark Aronson of Yale University advised that their Curator of Paintings, Angus Trumble, had found a connection to John Claude Daubuz of Killiow, Cornwall. He also kindly provided a photograph of Gainsborough’s “The Cottage Door”

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1 Comment »

  1. Hi, I have a similar query that I’m seeking assistance with. I work at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, and in our collection we have an oil on panel portrait of Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester. The painting sadly is unattributed, but is dated at c.1560-70. On the reverse is a wax seal (signet ring size) which is quite badly worn although some details and symbols are discernible/legible. I’d like to share this with you in the hope of identifying it. Please can you email me so that I can forward more information to you.

    Thanks
    Julia

    Comment by juliangv — 17 November 2009 @ 05:09 | Reply


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